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There's Black People Meet, for African-American dating, and Minder, which bills itself as a Muslim Tinder.

If you are ethnically Japanese, looking to meet ethnically Japanese singles, there is Japanese Cupid.

On dating app Hinge, you meet through friends, though not in the strictest sense of the term: Hinge connects you only with people who are Facebook friends of friends (and third-degree connections), so everyone who pops up as a match is not technically a stranger.

(Take a small half turn in the wrong direction, and there are dark places on the Internet like WASP Love, a website tagged with terms like "trump dating," "alt-right," "confederate," and "white nationalism.") All of these dating sites skirt around questions of identity—what does it mean to be "Jewish"?

I'm a native New Yorker, born and raised — I grew up in the East Village, and I live in Brooklyn now, with many stops in between.

When I was a kid, the internet was barely a thing yet, and also I was a kid, so I didn't spend a lot of time contemplating the best dating apps for New Yorkers. These days, I don't spend much time on dating apps — something for which I am also grateful — but when I was single, I dabbled here and there, and let's be real: I would've dabbled more in apps had I been working with a more up-to-date smartphone. But I've done some research, and I can tell you that some apps stand head and shoulders above the rest in terms of dating in New York, which is a difficult enough feat as it is.

East Meet East's headquarters is located near Bryant Park, in a sleek coworking office with white walls, lots of glass, and little clutter. A range of startups, from design agencies to burgeoning social media platforms share the space, and the relationships between members of the small staff are collegial and warm. In other words: less Chinese-Exclusion Act and more Stuff Asian People Like.

I'd originally asked for a visit, because I wanted to know who was behind the "That's not Racist" billboard and why, but I quickly learned that the billboard was just one corner of a peculiar and inscrutable (at least to me) branding universe. I asked East Meet East's CEO Mariko Tokioka about the "That's not Racist" billboard and she and Kenji Yamazaki, her cofounder, explained that it was meant to be a response to their online critics, whom they described as non-Asians who call the app racist, for catering exclusively to Asians.

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